Heaven is a Wonderful Place

We used to sing a song in Sunday school called Heaven is a Wonderful Place. The gang from Psalty the Singing Song Book would sing about a place filled with glory and grace and Jesus.

IMG_3567After college, as I read more and matured, my view of heaven shifted from a place we go to a restoration of what God has given us. A place filled with glory and grace? Isn’t that what Jesus called us to do, here and now, on this earth? Or, I love N.T. Wright’s image of a place of rest before the restoration.

My maternal grandmother died this week. She was 92 years old, missed my grandfather for the past 12 years, and was ready to see Jesus. And I’ve found that all my intellectual images of heaven leave and I hope that she is actually seeing Jesus and my grandpa and her brother and sister and friends who have gone on before her. I want her to be dancing and eating incredible foods.

Those images give me comfort and hope. But I still grapple with the idea of heaven as our only future goal. What about this earth God gave us? What does John 3:16 mean when it says,

God so loved the world

It doesn’t say God just loved humanity or God just loved Christians. It says God loved this world. It reminds me that, while I do long for heaven and restoration, I also long for restoration now. And maybe that’s what the glory of heaven is. Finally seeing that restoration.

How has your view of heaven changed as your faith has grown? What gives you comfort?

Linked with Five Minute Friday, a time to write without editing. Today’s prompt is “future.”

 

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10 thoughts on “Heaven is a Wonderful Place

  1. Beautifully done, Annie. I’m so sorry about your grandmother.

    I don’t think of Heaven much; I’ll get there soon enough, and then will know.

    I think part of this seeming disinterest (which puzzles some of those around me) is that when I think of Heaven I think of multidimensionality. Not only in the physical and sensory meaning, but a multidimensionality of spirit.

    We are now shadows, projected onto a flat surface, only crude hints of what we really are. Even more, we are shadows of shadows. A three-dimensional model can be built to represent a tesseract, a four-dimensional ‘cube’, and that model indeeds cast a two dimensional shadow.

    So perhaps we here now are separated from the tripartite Almighty by the two dimensions of the Son and the Holy Ghost?

    I don’t know, but I’m pretty sure the truth will be more glorious than anything we could have imagined.

    #1 at FMF this week.

    http://blessed-are-the-pure-of-heart.blogspot.com/2017/06/your-dying-spouse-318-pain-glory-and.html

    1. I think that’s so right, Andrew – we are shadows of what is to come. Which is so incredible to think about… I love how C.S. Lewis paints that image in Perelandra (of the Space Trilogy) – that heaven is so far outside our imagination. I just know, however it looks or however we experience it, will be beyond what we can fathom.

  2. Thanks a lot! Now I’ll have that Psalty song playing through my head for the rest of the day! LOL

    As a child, I pictured heaven as this city where everything was made from gold and pearls. But now I picture the gold as the light radiating off of our Creator and not necessarily literal gold. I love the picture that CS Lewis writes for us at the end of the Last Battle of the new Narnia being a more beautiful and clear picture of the old Narnia. I picture heaven being sort of like that. The creativity of earth and her plants, animals, wildlife, and well, all of her nature but purer. I also can’t wait to meet and converse with all the heroes of old. I can’t wait to discuss poetry with King David, talk about what it was like to be the mother of our Savior with Mary, and stroll through the meadows and along the streams of heaven in deep discussion with Jesus. 🙂

    1. Ha! Psalty is catchy… 😉 Yes! The Last Battle is such an amazing image of heaven – so much clearer than Earth. Whatever it is, I’m thankful that it’s beyond anything we can fathom. Thanks for stopping by!

  3. I don’t know what heaven is like, the Bible really tells us little. I do believe it is more glorious than our mind can ever imagine. I’m sorry your grandmother has left. As for this Earth, God created it so of course He loves it and I guess we should love it as much as He does, or as close as we can. Thanks for sharing. #74.

  4. I like the phrase you said about Heaven now being the rest before the coming Restoration of the New Earth.
    I think about Heaven frequently.
    I think it will be vivid. For lack of a better word. In every facet, detail, and experience.
    I think what I most anticipate is a complete lack of fear swallowed up in the presence of Love Himself, Jesus.
    When someone dies an untimely death or tragic death you are close to, it leaves you wondering.
    There’s a restless feeling we get when things aren’t right here. Because we know they are meant to be right. And that somewhere is Heaven.
    I get what you are saying about what about the here and now and this world.
    Since you mentioned Psalty I suppose we are in the same age bracket.
    I remember always being frustrated with people who talked about how horrible the world was and how it was only getting more horrible. All.my.life.
    As a teenager I wanted to say, “Please stop. I’ve never heard a positive word about this world and it’s the only one I’ve known. I want to hope to make a difference. Anyways.”
    Sometimes I still feel like that, though the storms of life have left me hungry for Heaven.

    1. I love how you phrase it, “you know they are meant to be right.” I guess that’s what this longing is all about, isn’t it? Knowing that it’s not right here, but it will be…. Thanks for stopping by!

  5. Sorry for your loss friend. I’m with you. I often wonder what heaven is like too. I don’t think we’ll honestly know until we get there ourselves. But it helps me to find hope when I think of my loved ones reuniting up there. I’m over in the 96 spot this week.

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