Holy Curiosity

Cara Meredith is hosting a series this year on Holy Curiosity. Since I’m in the midst of this nonstop curiosity-filled season, I was inspired to reflect on my own experience with the holiness of exploration. And the need to remember my own curiosity needs to be nourished.

Here’s an excerpt, but head over to Cara’s to read the whole post.

IMG_9935.jpgI’ve always been a curious person. When I was young and had a question, my dad would point me in the direction of his out-of-date set of encyclopedias. Sometimes my question was answered, but more often, I would get sucked into reading about other places and ideas and histories.

As a teacher, I was surrounded by curiosity and in charge of facilitating it in a meaningful way. My days were spent creating activities and lessons that guided my students toward more questions and ideas. I still made time for my own curiosity, through books and travel and cultural events.

And then I became a mom. Everyone knows kids are curious – google it and you’ll find quotes from Walt Disney and Madeleine L’Engle to Eleanor Roosevelt and Albert Einstein about the incredible curiosity of children. Mine are no exception – my three year old explores and questions her world constantly.

As my daughter became more active and more curious, I found myself outsourcing my own curiosity. I was surrounded and enthralled by Bea’s discoveries – who has time to add to that full day? I continued to read and my taste turned more and more toward nonfiction – a way to continue learning, but I didn’t really allow time for my own curiosities. I pushed them into the margins and told myself that one day I’d have time for my own interests again. Today is the day to focus on my kids; to build their own discoveries; to cherish these quickly passing moments.

I’m sure you know where this is going. Outsourcing curiosity is not sustainable or healthy.

Head over to Cara’s to find out what I discovered by recognizing my own need to pursue curiosity. And, check out the rest of Cara’s guest bloggers. There are some wonderful reflections on our need for being curious!

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